The SpaceX prototype of the Starship rocket SN8 explodes on influence after a take a look at flight at excessive altitude

SpaceX’s prototype spacecraft SN8 takes off.

SpaceX

SpaceX launched its latest Starship prototype on Wednesday in a flight test at an altitude of about 40,000 feet that appeared to be successful until the last moment.

The Starship prototype Serial Number 8 or SN8 launched smoothly from SkyX’s facility in Boca Chica, Texas. The missile appeared to be achieving some of its intended development goals, including testing its aerodynamics and flipping it to prepare for landing.

But the missile exploded on impact when attempting to land after flying for more than six minutes.

Despite the explosive ending, SpaceX CEO Elon Musk quickly shared his excitement for the overall flight test results – an important step forward in the development of the next-generation Starship rocket.

“Successful ascent, conversion to collection tanks and precise flap control to the landing point!” Said Musk.

Musk added clarifications about the cause of the hard landing but said the company “got all the data we needed”.

“The pressure in the fuel pot was low during the landing burn, which resulted in a high touchdown speed and high RUD [Rapid Unscheduled Disassembly]Said Musk. “Congratulations SpaceX Team Hell yeah !!”

Given the numerous milestones SpaceX wanted to achieve with the test, Musk had given the rocket little chance of complete success on the first try.

“A lot of things have to go right, so maybe a 1/3 chance” that the missile will land in one piece, Musk had said.

Similarly, in a pre-launch statement on its website, SpaceX warned that even a crash or explosion wasn’t necessarily a failure for that flight.

“Success in such a test is not measured by the achievement of specific goals, but by how much we can learn to inform and improve the probability of success in the future, as SpaceX is rapidly advancing the development of Starship,” said the company.

The spaceship prototype SN8 breaks off its attempt at launch on December 8, 2020.

SpaceX

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